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Base beaver finds a new home

Adam Jacobs and Zachary Bair, wildlife technicians with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, were called in on Aug. 29, 2011 to make a health assessment on our resident beaver and relocate him from a water run-off area near fuel storage tanks on base to a safe and isolated waterway nearby.  The relocation effort took only two hours to complete.

Adam Jacobs and Zachary Bair, wildlife technicians with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, were called in on Aug. 29, 2011 to make a health assessment on our resident beaver and relocate him from a water run-off area near fuel storage tanks on base to a safe and isolated waterway nearby. The relocation effort took only two hours to complete.

WILLOW GROVE AIR RESERVE STATION, Pa. --      This past August brought about the discovery of a beaver trying to make a permanent home of the water run-off containment area located near the fuel storage tanks on base.
His choice of building his dam by the outflow valve meant he had to go.
     Two wildlife technicians from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) were called in on Aug. 28, 2011 to make a health assessment on the animal and relocate the beaver to a safe and isolated waterway nearby. Zachary Bair with the USDA identified the beaver as a male, approximately one year old and exhausted from rebuilding his den several times. "Be it good or bad, beavers are wildlife environment makers. They create wetlands for plant life, fish and aquatic birds," Bair said.
     The beaver was captured and quickly caged by the wildlife team. A truck ride to his new remote home happened immediately after.  Opening the cage door at the pond water' s edge, the animal slowly emerged, glanced around, then headed straight off into the water.  A follow-up visit one week later found the beaver well fed and enjoying his afternoon swim ending with a tail slap.