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Horsham hosts a colorful way to end the duty day

Tech. Sgt. Ryan Maloney, the 111th Attack Wing fitness NCO in charge, stands with members of the 111th Force Support Squadron Services Flight while administering a fitness assessment at Horsham Air Guard Station, Pa., Aug. 13, 2016.  Maloney helped to spearhead the upcoming Military Color Fun Run slated for Oct. 15, 2016. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Airman Timi Jones)

Tech. Sgt. Ryan Maloney, the 111th Attack Wing fitness NCO in charge, stands with members of the 111th Force Support Squadron Services Flight while administering a fitness assessment at Horsham Air Guard Station, Pa., Aug. 13, 2016. Maloney helped to spearhead the upcoming Military Color Fun Run slated for Oct. 15, 2016. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Airman Timi Jones)

Senior Airman Devon Barbieri, the 111th Attack Wing Fitness Assessment Cell (FAC), models the installation’s official Military Color Fun Run shirt during August’s unit training assembly at Horsham Air Guard Station, Pa., Aug. 13, 2016. Participants for the event will receive a shirt upon registration. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Airman Timi Jones)

Senior Airman Devon Barbieri, the 111th Attack Wing Fitness Assessment Cell (FAC), models the installation’s official Military Color Fun Run shirt during August’s unit training assembly at Horsham Air Guard Station, Pa., Aug. 13, 2016. Participants for the event will receive a shirt upon registration. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Airman Timi Jones)

HORSHAM AIR GUARD STATION, Pa. -- Fun, fitness and festivities are a few elements to expect during the inaugural Horsham Air Guard Station Military Color Fun Run scheduled here at 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 15.

Commencing at the base gym, participants will have the choice of sharing in a 5k (approximately three-mile) run or a one-mile walk while being showered with very colorful, bright powder along the way.

"I think this is an easy way to incorporate everyone. People who are on profiles can do the walk," said Senior Airman Devon Barbieri, 111th Attack Wing Services Flight, Fitness Assessment Cell (FAC). "It's not timed, there's no stress. So it's pure fun. It's pure morale."

The intent of the run is to boost spirits, add some extra fun to the drill weekend and promote overall well-being.

"It's just something to bring everyone together, have a good time and obviously incorporate fitness at the same time," said Tech. Sgt. Ryan Maloney, 111th ATKW Service Fight, fitness NCO in charge.

Earlier this year, the FAC held a "Biggest Loser" challenge which attracted 30 individuals who wanted to adopt healthier lifestyles and shed some pounds. With dieting, exercise, teamwork and friendly competition, many challengers stuck with their plan and met their goal, making the "Biggest Loser" a great success. 

They are hoping the Military Color Fun Run will also be a big hit. And so far, the response has been remarkable.

"Once I sent out the email and it went out to all 111th...I'm just getting phone calls and emails and everyone's running and giving Airman Barbieri [registration forms] like 'Here, registrations! Registrations!'" Maloney said. "I was like 'This is gonna be a lot bigger than I thought!'"

Having reached out to the Army Reserve and Guard members on the installation, the services flight is preparing for an impressive turnout.

"We want the whole base to come out and really get going with the fitness," Barbieri said.

Maloney also hopes to demonstrate that working out does not have to be grueling - it can be enjoyable
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"Half the battle is just getting to the gym," he said. "You don't have to go to the gym and run 30 miles. We just want to promote just getting out there."

The run costs nothing and participants will get a free shirt upon registration.

"This is [being held at] the end of a duty day, so ... end your day with some fun," Barbieri said.

After completing the run, participants can also look forward to some fruit and light refreshments being supplied by the services Guardsmen.

The more people who partake, the more aspects Maloney hopes to include in the event.

"If it gets bigger and bigger, it could just turn into a [huge] event," he said.