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MQ-9 Reaper

MQ-9 Reaper      The MQ-9 Reaper is an armed, multi-mission, medium-altitude, long endurance remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) that is employed primarily in a hunter/killer role against dynamic execution targets and secondarily as an intelligence collection asset. Given its significant loiter time, wide-range sensors, multi-mode communications suite, and precision weapons -- it provides a unique capability to autonomously execute the kill chain (find, fix, track, target, execute, and assess) against high value, fleeting, and time sensitive targets (TSTs).
     Reapers can also perform the following missions and tasks: intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (ISR), close air support (CAS), combat search and rescue (CSAR), precision strike, buddy-laser, convoy/raid overwatch, route clearance, target development, and terminal air guidance. The MQ-9's capabilities make it uniquely qualified to conduct irregular warfare operations in support of Combatant Commander objectives.  MORE...

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  • 111th Attack Wing History

    Horsham Air Guard Station, PennsylvaniaThe 111th Attack Wing history begins with the establishment of the 103rd Observation Squadron, in June 1924.  The 103rd was founded and first commanded by Maj. Charles Biddle, who had flown in WWI as part of the famous Lafayette Escadrilles (a volunteer group of American pilots flying French aircraft before
  • Facebook User Agreement

    The following User Agreement (“Agreement”) governs the use of official Department of Defense social media sites and pages to include social networking pages, web blogs and file sharing sites, along with all policies applicable to the .mil domain.Please read the rules contained in this Agreement carefully. You can access this Agreement any time.
  • History

    The Early Years The 111th Fighter Wing history begins with the establishment of the 103rd Observation Squadron in June 1924. The 103rd was founded and eventually commanded by Major Charles Biddle, who had flown in World War I as part of the famous Lafayette Escadrilles (a volunteer group of American pilots flying French aircraft before our
  • Horsham Air Guard Station Environmental Commitment Statement

    DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCEHEADQUARTERS 111 TH FIGHTER WINGHORSHAM AIR GUARD STATION PENNSYLVANIA31 October 2012MEMORANDUM FOR ALL WING PERSONNEL, TENANTS, & AGENCIESSUBJECT: DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCEHEADQUARTERS 1 t t TH FIGHTER WINGHORSHAM AIR GUARD STATION PENNSYLVANIA31 October 2012MEMORANDUM FOR ALL WING PERSONNEL, TENANTS, &
  • PFOS, PFOA Fact Sheet

    Subject: Actions taken by the 111th Attack Wing (ATKW) to address PFAS (Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl substances) issues. Background: PFAS are a group of chemicals used to make fluoropolymer coatings and products that resist heat, oil, stains, grease, and water. These coatings can be used in such varied products as clothing, furniture, adhesives, food packaging, heat-resistant non-stick cooking surfaces, and the insulation of electrical wire. Firefighting foams used at military and commercial airports contain PFAS. Many chemicals in this group have been a concern because they do not break down in the environment, can move through soils and enter drinking water sources, and they build up in fish and wildlife. The 111th ATKW has been actively working to address PFAS issues at Biddle Air National Guard Base since they were first discovered and confirmed in 2014. The 111th has partnered with local communities, Navy, Air National Guard (ANG), U.S. Air Force (USAF), PA Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to address drinking water quality, and storm water run-off from the base. Key Points: • Presently, Biddle ANG Base/111th ATKW is in compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency's lifetime health advisory (HA) level for PFOS and PFOA of 70 parts per trillion (ppt). Where the Department of Defense (DoD) is the known source of PFAS, no one (on or off base) is drinking water above these levels. • The DoD, USAF, ANG and Biddle ANG Base/111th ATKW are moving forward in a systematic, enterprise-wide approach in their response to PFAS. This approach requires extensive coordination with all parties to ensure consistency across all DoD installations.
  • RELATIVE RISK SITE EVALUATION BIDDLE ANG BASE

    Introduction The Department of Defense (DoD) identified certain per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) as emerging contaminants of concern which affected installations across the Air Force. When the term "Air Force" is used in this fact sheet, it includes Air National Guard. Specifically, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluorobutanesulfonic acid (PFBS) are components of legacy Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) that the Air Force began using in the 1970s as a firefighting agent to extinguish petroleum fires. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued lifetime drinking water Health Advisories (HA) for PFOS and PFOA, and health-based regional screening levels for PFBS. The Air Force has systematically evaluated potential AFFF releases on all Installations and former Installations. It began with the Preliminary Assessments, or PAs, that identified potential release areas. First responders, fire chiefs, and hangar staff were interviewed to determine where a release or a spill may have occurred on an Installation (for example, aircraft crash site or an accidental hangar AFFF release). Once the information in the PA was collected, a Facility Investigation (FI) was initiated, to take soil and water samples and analyzed the media for PFAS compounds at the potential release areas. The intention of the FI was to determine if a release had occurred and to determine the impacts to soil and/or groundwater. The next step in the process is called the Relative Risk Site Evaluation, or RRSE, which is a tool used to sequence Sites/Installations to begin a Remedial Investigation, or RI. Air Force Installations are at the beginning of the more detailed investigative stage, the RI, to determine, where action is needed and to identify remedial technologies. The Biddle ANG Base (Horsham AGS) PFAS PA and SI can be found at the Air Force CERCLA Administrative Record (AR): https://ar.afcec-cloud.af.mil/ Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on “Continue to site”, then select Air National Guard (e.g., Active, ANG, BRAC), scroll down the Installation List and click on Biddle ANG Base (Horsham AGS), PA then enter the AR Number 467649 in the "AR #" field for the PA. For the FI, enter the AR Number 5574338. Then click “Search” at the bottom of the page. Click on the spy glass to view the document. More information on the Air Force response to PFOS and PFOA can be found at: https://www.afcec.af.mil/WhatWeDo/Environment/Perfluorinated-Compounds/
  • Story of the 111th Attack Wing

    The 111th Attack Wing history begins with the establishment of the 103rd Observation Squadron, in June 1924.  The 103rd was founded and first commanded by Maj. Charles Biddle, who had flown in WWI as part of the famous Lafayette Escadrilles (a volunteer group of American pilots flying French aircraft before our country's entry into WWI).   This new
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